Over and under in football betting

A Bettor Who seem to Chipped your Horse-Racing Rule

The difficulty is that you need to have a minimum number of fixed sums bet on the football and the coupon’s odds will change significantly.

The price as it stands for all of those teams is so much higher than when they qualified that there is little point betting on any of them.

So when you are at the bookie or just standing in front of a TV, pick five or six teams you think are capable of qualifying from their groups and place a bet on each of them for around £2 each.

That way, the odds will change to something closer to their actual chances of reaching the competition as opposed to setting a minimum on each team.

In reality, it won’t make much difference to your winnings, so you could even change your four bets each week.

Gareth Southgate’s squad trained at Wembley this afternoon, before facing Nigeria on Saturday evening

Seriously, it’s that simple. Go to a shop on the high street and bet on the results of football games. In fact, we don’t even need to mention real-world money. I bet with money earned from my weekly wage as a reporter on the Mirror.

The point is that if you’re sensible and you get a bit of help from The Mail on Sunday, this can be a pretty good way of making money on the odds.

And there are only three things that are different to the way it’s done in the real world.

Firstly, no one knows who you are – you’ll get away with this one, but you won’t make friends if you tell your friends you are betting on football at a bookie.

It’s hard to describe the feeling of the first time I got a nice little win, which I spent around £30 on the bookies, in the past few days – and you don’t need to mention the newspaper you’re working for.

Secondly, no one is calling you or sending you letters with offers of unauthorised moneylending, if the biggest win you have ever made is for £3.

Bookmakers do give you an email to be sent with special offers, but as it says on the site: ‘The product is solely intended for customers wishing to gamble away funds outside the regulation bookmaker’ – this is a warning that there is the chance that the money will be seized if you are stopped by police, or if you are found guilty of unauthorised lending.

Bookies do give you an email to be sent with special offers, but as it says on the site: ‘The product is solely intended for customers wishing to gamble away funds outside the regulation bookmaker’ – this is a warning

Thirdly, all the odds are supplied by the bookies – although they are pretty close to the official odds when it comes to England qualifying.

Last Sunday, I placed a few bets – including one for Harry Kane to score four times for Tottenham against Southampton. I had five £2 bets.

The odds on Kane getting four were 11-4 and 12-1 on him not scoring. This is the way they always are. Kane is no worse than a 12-1 bet to get four.

In fact, he is such a bargain that the bookies seem to have a policy of keeping any bonuses – or wins – for those punters who actually get those big goals.

I thought I had another one, too, when we were 3-0 up against Panama.